Thursday, 24 July 2014

Nightingale Community Garden links with local foodbank

At an open meeting on the morning of Saturday 5 July 2014, Nightingale Community Garden officially linked up with Bethesda Foodbank in Dinas Powys. Part of the Vale Foodbank, and under the Trussell Trust umbrella, the Bethesda Foodbank opened in Sept 2012 (see link below).


Mike Groves of the Vale Foodbank talked at the meeting about the excellent work that the Vale Foodbank does in helping to feed people who suddenly find themselves without sufficient resources (e.g. due to benefit cuts) to feed themselves or their families.

This summer, gardeners are donating surplus produce from their Community Garden plots to the Foodbank. For the past couple of weeks, donated veg placed in a basket in the wooden shed at the back of the garden has been taken over to the Bethesda Chapel around midday on Wednesday.

Rob McGhee of Creative Rural Communities, who played a key role in getting the garden established, talked about the success of the Community Foodie scheme in the Vale of Glamorgan. A network of gardens in the Vale has got people growing more of their own food, while helping to bring communities together. Also in the photo above are Cllr. Keith Hatton and Elizabeth Millard, the co-founders of Nightingale Community Garden (for the full story follow the links below).

There was another good turnout for a garden meeting. Robin Harrison was again present to answer gardeners’ questions. This time, he bought along some fragrant plants – of which I took home a sage and a lemon verbena. The gathering enjoyed free tea, coffee, lemonade and biscuits.


Nightingale Community Garden, though only opened last spring, has been looking mature and productive during this hot July. I’ll let these recent photos speak for themselves.


 
 
 
See also:

Vale Foodbank opens in Dinas Powys

http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/vale-foodbank-in-dinas-powys.html

Previous posts on Nightingale Community Garden in Dinas Powys

May 2014
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/05/creating-community-garden-11.html

Sept 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/creating-community-garden-10.html

June 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/creating-community-garden-9.html

April 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/creating-community-garden-8.html

March 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/creating-community-garden-7.html

Feb 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/creating-community-garden-6.html

Jan 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/creating-community-garden-5.html

Oct 2012
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/creating-community-garden-4.html

Aug 2012
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/creating-community-garden-3.html

Feb 2012
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/02/creating-community-garden-2.html

Jan 2012
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.com/2012/01/creating-community-garden.html
 

Wednesday, 23 July 2014

The Hayes, Cardiff

We are returned to The Hayes from the end of Hills Street, on this walking tour of Cardiff; just in time for a preview night at Miller & Carter. They officially open this Friday, on the corner of Hills Street and The Hayes, in the building previously inhabited by Habitat (who went into administration in 2011). Enter the new steakhouse from Hills Street, where they have seating outside.


Miller & Carter
9-11 The Hayes CF10 1AH (2037 2344)
It’s bustling at the Tuesday preview night at Miller & Carter Steakhouse. Beef sourced in Britain is the thing here (tagline: ‘for the love of steak’) and so steak it is for us. After a slightly disappointing graze option, involving not-so-crisp home-made tortilla chips and a spinach and mozzarella dip, we are quickly won over when the main courses arrive.

I opted for a ribeye (12oz) and my partner a rump (8oz). At Miller & Carter, the steaks are served with a signature cheesy onion loaf (excellent), ‘seasoned fries’ (i.e. lots of salt) default (or jacket potato if you ask), and an iceberg lettuce wedge; we approved of this no-messing side-salad, literally a quarter of a fresh lettuce with your choice of dressing drizzled on top (bacon and honey mustard for me). In addition, there is a choice of steak sauces (me: peppercorn). Very tasty steaks, cooked medium to our taste (medium is rarer than it used to be, for those who remember Berni Inns).


Chefs at the grills serve up the meat on to plates, with wooden boards being reserved for the Chateaubriand (16oz), the most tender cut on offer, which is recommended for sharing. It’s the most expensive steak option (£43.95), but with 50% off the food bill on the night they were in demand. Options 'on-the-bone’ are T-Bone, Porterhouse and barbequed ribs.

Miller & Carter are owned by Mitchells & Butlers. This is the 34th Miller & Carter Steakhouse to open in the UK. There is already one in Cardiff:  a unit attached to the Red Dragon development in Cardiff Bay (across the car park near the Futures Inn). However, this prime city centre location puts Miller & Carter centre stage on the Cardiff dining scene.


We drank a rather nice bottle of Rioja from the ample wine list; though my partner thought they needed to work on their coffees that concluded our meal. We remember the Berni Inns of old, when the cream was expertly layered on top of the liquor coffee. Although Berni Inns (1955-1995, then sold to Whitbread and converted to Beefeaters and Brewers Fayre) were not an Mitchells & Butlers brand (though rival Harvester still is), Miller & Carter is what the British Berni Inn-style steakhouse has evolved into. We heartily approve.

Incidentally, the 1937 grade-II listed Hayes Building, which was originally home of the Electricity Board, has been sensitively redeveloped. There's a bar area, main restaurant and an upstairs mezzanine floor with a good view of the kitchen.

Eating steak is a bit of a guilty pleasure for me these days. Beef production has a major environmental impact, in terms of land use, water resources and greenhouse gases; far more so than chicken and pork production. A report published today in PNAS reinforces this. "The biggest intervention people could make towards reducing their carbon footprints would not be to abandon cars, but to eat significantly less red meat", says Prof Tim Benton of the University of Leeds, commenting on the findings in today's The Guardian. It's only occasional steaks for me these days - and those have to be good ones like they serve here!

Hayes Island
Outside, in The Hayes, can we just acknowledge the Hayes Island Snack Bar for taking over the running of the underground Victorian toilets that the Council closed; they are very convenient and of historical interest. You will shortly be able to ask them for a code to visit.

Bailey Carvery
9 -11 The Hayes CF10 1AH (2023 7755)
Part of the same recent redevelopment that has created Miller & Carter, this is the basement restaurant - entered by doors just before St David’s Hall - that was for many years La Fosse restaurant. Bailey Carvery offers breakfast buffet and an all-day carvery. Billed as ‘The Great British Carvery’, you can get traditional Sunday carvery here, every day of the week: slow-roasted beef, pork, turkey and gammon, with steamed fresh veg.

St David’s Hall
Working Street CF10 1SH (2087 8444)
Concert hall and conference centre. The main bar is on Level 3, where you can also catch some excellent Roots concerts. Food is sometimes served here, for example, at the lunchtime series of chamber music concerts. A Pimms bar is currently here for the Welsh Proms. The Art Cafe Celf on Level 4 is usually open during the day for sandwiches, coffee and cake. My next trip to St David's Hall is for some desert blues with Tinariwen from Mali – most appropriate given the current hot weather (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. March 2012).

Opposite, in the Old Library building:

Bar 1867
Old Library, 18-19 Trinity Street CF10 1BH
When we passed on the other side of the Old Library in my recent Trinity Street post, this was called the ‘Big Blue Sports Bar’. Then, I wrote that it would most probably have changed its name again by the time we got to it.

There has been a series of food venues in this northern part of the Old Library building, since the actual library moved out. It was once ‘Que Pasa’, and more recently ‘The Exhibition’. The restaurant called ‘The Old Library’ did some notable redecoration, but was also notable for being one of the first businesses in Cardiff to be awarded a zero Food Hygiene Rating, after they were first introduced by the Welsh Assembly Government in 2011.

Bar 1867 goes in for pub classics (meals for £6 and specials for £7.50): steak and ale pie, fish and chips, chicken curry, faggots and peas, burgers, jacket potatoes.

The Old Library building dates from 1881. The main Cardiff Library was located here between 1882 and 1988 (it is now located at the other end of The Hayes). Today, the building also houses the Tourist Information Centre and The Cardiff Story, a museum about the history of the city that is well worth a visit. The Cardiff Story has some interesting information about local food businesses (see link below).

I will meet you outside The Cardiff Story next time, for the next leg of our walk around Cardiff.

See also:
The Cardiff Story opens
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2011/04/cardiff-story.html

Previously, on the Walking Tour of Cardiff:
St David’s 3
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/06/st-davids-3-cardiff.html
St David’s 2
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/05/st-davids-2-cardiff.html
St David’s 1
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/st-davids-1-cardiff.html
Queen Street Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/queens-arcade-cardiff.html
Duke Street Arcade and Duke Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/03/duke-street-arcade-duke-street-cardiff.html
High Street Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/high-street-arcade-cardiff.html
Church Street and St John’s Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/church-street-and-st-johns-street.html
Cardiff Market
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/cardiff-market.html
Wharton Street and Trinity Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/12/wharton-street-and-trinity-street.html
Morgan Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/12/morgan-arcade-cardiff.html
Royal Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/royal-arcade-cardiff.html
The Hayes
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/the-hayes-cardiff.html
The Old Brewery Quarter
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/the-old-brewery-quarter-cardiff.html
Caroline Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/caroline-street-cardiff.html
Mill Lane and Wyndham Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/mill-lane-and-wyndham-arcade-cardiff.html
St Mary Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/st-mary-street-cardiff.html
High Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/05/high-street-cardiff.html
Castle Arcade and Castle Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/05/castle-arcade-and-castle-street-cardiff.html
Womanby Street and Quay Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/womanby-street-and-quay-street-cardiff.html
Westgate Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/westgate-street-cardiff.html
Riverside
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/riverside-cardiff.html
Cathedral Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/cathedral-road-cardiff.html
Pontcanna 2
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/pontcanna-2.html
Pontcanna 1
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/pontcanna-1-we-are-leaving-canton.html
North Canton
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/north-canton.html
Cowbridge Road East 3
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/cowbridge-road-east-3-llandaff-road-to.html
Cowbridge Road East 2
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/cowbridge-road-east-2-wyndham-crescent.html
Cowbridge Road East 1
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/cowbridge-road-east-1-cathedral-road-to.html
Bute Park
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/bute-park-cardiff.html
Cathays Park
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/cathays-park-cardiff.html
Cathays Terrace
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/cathays-terrace-cardiff.html
Salisbury Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/salisbury-road-cardiff.html
Woodville Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/woodville-road-cardiff.html
Crwys Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/crwys-road-cardiff.html
Wellfield Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/wellfield-road-cardiff.html
Albany Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/albany-road-cardiff.html
City Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/city-road-cardiff.html

Sunday, 29 June 2014

St David’s 3, Cardiff

This is the strand on this food blog in which we are slowly walking around Cardiff, checking what's current on the Cardiff food scene and reaching occasional conclusions about food trends.

We previously left Eastside in the St David’s centre, and are now outside looking up at the new Admiral Building (South Wales-based insurance company), which is being erected in front of you. Turn right, and negotiate your way past the building work to:

Cineworld
Mary Ann Street CF10 2EN
15-screen cinema, where there is still time to buy fizzy drinks, coffee and popcorn in the foyer before the film starts. Includes Gala Electronic Casino (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. March 2012).

Across the road:

Motorpoint Arena
Mary Ann Street CF10 2EQ
Formerly the Cardiff International Arena (CIA), this large concert venue also hosts conferences and events. My next scheduled trip here is to see the Peter Gabriel 'So' tour later this year (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. June 2013).

Opposite, the Flaming Dragon Chinese restaurant on the corner is closed. Across Mary Ann Street:

Park Inn by Radisson
Mary Ann Street CF10 2JH
Hotel with the RBG Bar and Grill, offering a range of British classics, pasta and pizza etc, with an outdoor café/bar terrace (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. June 2013).

Follow Mary Ann Street around, walking away from the Motorpoint Arena.

Heard the one about ‘Location, Location, Location’? US-based Hooters haven’t. They opened their second UK outlet along here in 2011 (the first is still open in Nottingham), in the worst location in Cardiff city centre. The Sports Café and Bar that replaced it closed within months. Pass this empty unit. We are now at the back of the St David’s 2009 extension.

Tesco Express
Mary Ann Street CF10 2EN
A convenience food store, with a convenient cashpoint outside.

Pass on Boots, on your right, which has its main entrance inside through the entrance into the Grand Arcade where we were last time. On your left is anchor store John Lewis. Head toward the new library building and keep right, following the building round to:


Jamie’s Italian
69-70 Lower Ground Floor (outside), St David’s, The Hayes CF10 1GA (2002 7792)
I remember watching Jamie Oliver’s TV series on Italian food and thinking he had nothing particularly original or interesting to say on the subject. In hindsight, the TV production company was forking out for what was effectively a research trip for this venture. With the right business partners and chefs in place, Jamie’s Italian has been a big success. In addition to this one in Wales, there are nearly 40 Jamie’s Italians in England and Scotland, and others in countries around the world (though not Italy).


Cardiff’s Jamie’s Italian doesn’t feel like a traditional Italian restaurant, with its industrial design and retro British music. There are no pizzas, instead the approach is to adapt to British tastes and mainstream regional Italian dishes less known in the UK (e.g. turkey Milanese, arancini, Caprese and Bresaola salads, porchetta, crispy squid). Planks remain popular here: long wooden boards for shared platters, which you can buy on the way out (if you so wished).


We lunched here last week. I drank the Liberta lager, brewed for Jamie’s by the Freedom Brewery in Staffordshire (a understated lager brewed for food from a 'microbrewery' that appears to now be a fairly big brewery), while my dining partner had a refreshing home-made lemonade. For starters, we ordered the homemade breads from the ‘nibbles’ section: rosemary focaccia, sourdough, music bread and grissini, with olive oil/balsamic vinegar and a sun-dried tomato/olive tapenade. A good choice: the most interesting being the thin crispy Sardinian music bread (pane carasau), laden with seeds and ‘aniseedy’ flavour. Grissini, incidentally, are good old-fashioned breadsticks (why don’t they say so!).


My partner had the wild rabbit casarecce (a pasta shape similar to fusilli), with the rabbit ragù slow-cooked with garlic and herbs, mascarpone and lemon. I had the fish-of-the-day special: pan-fried hake with butter/parsley sauce, steamed mussels, roasted vine-ripe tomatoes and chargrilled asparagus tips, which was most enjoyable. The crunchy salad is very like coleslaw.

A shared frangipane tart (almond tart, akin to bakewell), with peach being the day’s seasonal fruit filling, and coffees concluded our meal.  Look out for the £10 off vouchers on a leaflet as you go in, which keeps the bill manageable (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. Nov 2011).

Starbucks Coffee
Lower Ground Floor, St David’s, The Hayes CF10 1GA (2034 1814)
Starbucks arrived in the UK in 1998 (a 'game-changer' as the annoying phrase goes), via the acquisition of Seattle Coffee Company stores. This one has the usual range of coffees, and some prime-location outdoor seating. I have not been in a Starbucks for years, so really cannot comment further.


Since we were in The Hayes last, the Hayes Island Snack Bar has been joined in the central square by a Sidoli’s ice cream stall for the summer, selling a good range of flavours produced by this family-owned Welsh ice cream company.

Turn right at the corner, into Hills Street:


Cosy Club
1 Hills Street (upstairs) CF10 2LE (2020 5998)
Go through the doors and up a rather OTT staircase, where you will find a bar and a dining area. Cardiff blogger Pint of 45 has already noted that this is not cosy and it’s not a club. It is an expanding chain though. The Cardiff Cosy Club, which opened in November 2012, is the largest of the seven Cosy Clubs to open so far (stretching all the way from Exeter to Cheltenham). The food is very British – pork belly, Cornish fish pie, duck’s shepherd’s pie, steaks, mussels, spinach and cheese soufflé. Brunch served most of the day and they cater for vegans. The burger range encompasses falafel, salmon and crayfish, and possibly even beef (Food Hygiene Rating 3: generally satisfactory. July 2013).

crêpeaffaire
1a Hills Street, CF10 2LE (2037 2249)
Started in London in 2004, by Daniel Spinath, there are now around 13 crêpeaffaires, in the UK (and Hamburg). Ten sweet and fourteen (4 of them veggie) savoury pancakes on the menu, along with breakfasts (including the Londoner breakfast crêpe) and waffles. Savoury crêpes served with salads for lunch, or can be taken in specially-designed triangular boxes. There’s a focus on the coffee (Food Hygiene Rating 3: generally satisfactory. July 2013).


Red Hot World Buffet
3-6 Hills Street, CF10 2LE (2034 2499)
I was here for opening night in October 2011, and have been back on several occasions since. It’s good when you are in a group, especially with people having very different tastes in food. It’s the longest buffet in Wales, designed by Red Hot’s corporate chef Deepak Bahuguna; serving around 300 dishes from around the world, including Indian, Thai, Chinese, Japanese, Cajun, Tex Mex, Italian, Mediterranean and British. You can spot the first timers – plates piled high with foods that should never be seen on the same plate. Red Hot World Buffet started in, you guessed it, Nottingham in 2004, and there are around eight now in the UK (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. June 2013).

Walk back down Hills Street to The Hayes, and I will see you there next time.

See also:

Red Hot World Buffet opens in Cardiff:
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/red-hot-world-buffet-cardiff.html

Previously, on the Walking Tour of Cardiff:

St David’s 2
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/05/st-davids-2-cardiff.html
St David’s 1
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/st-davids-1-cardiff.html
Queen Street Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/queens-arcade-cardiff.html
Duke Street Arcade and Duke Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/03/duke-street-arcade-duke-street-cardiff.html
High Street Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/high-street-arcade-cardiff.html
Church Street and St John’s Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/church-street-and-st-johns-street.html
Cardiff Market
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/cardiff-market.html
Wharton Street and Trinity Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/12/wharton-street-and-trinity-street.html
Morgan Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/12/morgan-arcade-cardiff.html
Royal Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/royal-arcade-cardiff.html
The Hayes
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/the-hayes-cardiff.html
The Old Brewery Quarter
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/the-old-brewery-quarter-cardiff.html
Caroline Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/caroline-street-cardiff.html
Mill Lane and Wyndham Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/mill-lane-and-wyndham-arcade-cardiff.html
St Mary Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/st-mary-street-cardiff.html
High Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/05/high-street-cardiff.html
Castle Arcade and Castle Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/05/castle-arcade-and-castle-street-cardiff.html
Womanby Street and Quay Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/womanby-street-and-quay-street-cardiff.html
Westgate Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/westgate-street-cardiff.html
Riverside
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/riverside-cardiff.html
Cathedral Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/cathedral-road-cardiff.html
Pontcanna 2
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/pontcanna-2.html
Pontcanna 1
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/pontcanna-1-we-are-leaving-canton.html
North Canton
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/north-canton.html
Cowbridge Road East 3
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/cowbridge-road-east-3-llandaff-road-to.html
Cowbridge Road East 2
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/cowbridge-road-east-2-wyndham-crescent.html
Cowbridge Road East 1
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/cowbridge-road-east-1-cathedral-road-to.html
Bute Park
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/bute-park-cardiff.html
Cathays Park
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/cathays-park-cardiff.html
Cathays Terrace
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/cathays-terrace-cardiff.html
Salisbury Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/salisbury-road-cardiff.html
Woodville Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/woodville-road-cardiff.html
Crwys Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/crwys-road-cardiff.html
Wellfield Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/wellfield-road-cardiff.html
Albany Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/albany-road-cardiff.html
City Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/city-road-cardiff.html

Thursday, 26 June 2014

The proposed 'Garden Bridge' in London

The ‘Garden Bridge’ project in London seems to be getting an easy ride in the media. Maybe it’s the involvement of designer Thomas Heatherwick and the actress/campaigner Joanna Lumley, who thought it up, two people who have done much in recent years to deserve our respect; or the support of Boris Johnson, who is inexplicably popular in London.

The proposed pedestrian bridge will cost around £175 million. It will link the South Bank (near the National Theatre) to the north bank (near Temple underground station), a section of the Thames already well served by bridges. The Garden Bridge Trust have already been promised £30 million by the Government, £30 million from Transport for London, and £30 million from private donors, according to the Evening Standard (below). Current plans aim to have it built by 2018.

Don’t get me wrong. I am sure this bridge will look great and, if done well, will become a major tourist attraction. What annoys me is when Heatherwick and the Garden Bridge Trust team invoke the spirit of guerrilla and community gardening, and projects like the High Line in New York, as inspiration for and in justification of the project. The ‘garden bridge’ is the opposite of those things, and that’s what this blog post is about.

Let’s be clear, the ‘garden bridge’ is not a green project. It is a massive concrete engineering construction project, with oversized planters on top. Crucially, the projects is a top-down initiative; exactly the opposite to guerrilla and community gardening, which are bottom-up and community-led initiatives.

In a recent Guardian article (26 June, link below), Heatherwick says, “It feels like we’re trying to pull off a big crime” and describes the design evolution as a form of “guerrilla gardening”. The team may be pulling off a crime, but not the one they think they’re pulling off. Here is a definition of Guerrilla Gardening (from Richard Reynolds’ book ‘On Guerrilla Gardening: A Handbook for Gardening Without Boundaries’, Bloomsbury, 2008): “THE ILLICIT CULTIVATION OF SOMEONE ELSE’S LAND.”

The most celebrated guerrilla gardens, of course, become legitimate because they are embraced by the communities they spring up in. They become officially recognised and much-loved community gardens and allotments. Nevertheless, people enter into guerrilla gardening knowing they are beautifying or producing food in a temporary neglected space over what is likely to be a relatively short period of time. This is the spirit of guerrilla gardening. So, hardly a corporate construction project.

Let’s look at the specific example of the High Line in Manhattan, a mile-long elevated linear park so beloved of architects like Heatherwick, who invokes it as an inspiration. The important point to get is that the High Line was once a railway viaduct built in the 1930s, which was abandoned in the 1980s. It’s a great example of urban renewal. In the years after the last train used the railway, local residents noticed that drought-resistant grasses, shrubs and trees were thriving. It was urban explorers and guerrilla gardeners who first saw the potential for turning this derelict structure into an elevated garden and park. The High Line was very nearly demolished, but community organisations, in particular the non-profit Friends of the High Line, prevented this from happening. Gardens cultivated with the help of community groups alternate with the native flora sections along this very popular urban park; the first section of which opened in 2006, while the third and final section is due to open later this year.

The High Line itself draws some of its ideas from the Promenade Plantée in Paris, which was the world's first elevated park, and was also built on an abandoned railroad viaduct. A London project truly inspired by these highly successful urban renewal schemes would take a dreary existing London bridge, pedestrianise it, and turn it into a green oasis.

Building something from scratch at vast expense to mimic what others have done on derelict urban infrastructure just does not add up. The spirit of the Olympic Games has been invoked, but the Olympic construction at its best rejuvenated a large contaminated derelict area (At worst, of course, it built a car park over local community allotments).

Allotments and community gardens owe everything to enthusiastic local people who garden them. They fulfil a real community need. What would £175 million (the estimated cost of London’s ‘garden bridge’) buy in terms of grass-roots greening projects?

The desire to garden in an urban environment is very strong. There are waiting lists for allotments in towns all over the UK. In Dinas Powys, we established a Community Garden on an abandoned play area, which had become overgrown and was the focus for anti-social behaviour. This is now a highly productive local food growing area for around 30 families and is a community hub in a very positive sense. Recent plans include promoting pollinating insects in the area and donating food to a local Food Bank.

It cost around £35,000 to create the Nightingale Community Garden in Dinas Powys (£28,000 was obtained from the Welsh Assembly government’s Tidy Towns initiative and £5,000 from the Vale of Glamorgan’s Creative Rural Communities initiative). So, £175 million could alternatively be used to create 5,000 such Community Gardens around the UK. Given that there are 936 towns listed for England, and around 170 in Wales, this could create a veritable network of community-led local food production. Linked to an education programme, it could represent a revolution in terms of food self-sufficiency, environmental and health benefits (better and cheaper food, health benefits arising from active gardening and social interaction, knock-on effects in health-care spending, reduced crime due to urban renewal etc. etc.).

Finally, I suspect that the maintenance costs of the ‘garden bridge’ have been wildly underestimated. Being a top-down corporate project it cannot expect the level of dedication from community groups and volunteers that make grass-roots community gardens so successful.

I will probably be heading down to London to be one of the first to see the ‘garden bridge’ when it opens. It does sound like an inspiring architectural project. But, I won't be buying into any of the greenwash.

See also:
Oliver Wainwright in The Guardian:
http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/jun/24/garden-bridge-london-thomas-heatherwick-joanna-lumley

Evening Standard:
http://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/londoners-support-plans-for-garden-bridge-across-the-river-thames-9237778.html

Creating a Community Garden (the Nightingale Community Garden in Dinas Powys as an example project):

May 2014
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/05/creating-community-garden-11.html

Sept 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/creating-community-garden-10.html

June 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/creating-community-garden-9.html

April 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/creating-community-garden-8.html

March 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/creating-community-garden-7.html

Feb 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/creating-community-garden-6.html

Jan 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/creating-community-garden-5.html

Oct 2012
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/creating-community-garden-4.html

Aug 2012
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/creating-community-garden-3.html

Feb 2012
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/02/creating-community-garden-2.html

Jan 2012
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.com/2012/01/creating-community-garden.html

Wednesday, 28 May 2014

Creating a Community Garden 11

In a series of posts, I have outlined the process by which Nightingale Community Garden in Dinas Powys was created and is developing (links below). It was first opened to local resident gardeners on 16 March 2013. On the recent sunny days, people have been getting their plots ready for another busy growing season.


Since my last dispatch, on the official opening in Sept 2013, compost bins have been built (by Stuart Hockley), a second tap installed, the few plots becoming vacant have been reassigned from the waiting list, and I have registered the garden as part of a Nectar Point Network (more on this later in the year).


This blog post is mainly photographs to show you how the garden is looking as it starts its second year. Not so long ago this was derelict land – an abandoned play area that was a focus for litter and anti-social behaviour – and now it is a community hub and a very productive growing area.


Below is my plot, with the runner beans going in a couple of days ago:


It will soon be time to pick some strawberries.



Previous posts on creating a Community Garden in Dinas Powys:

Sept 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/creating-community-garden-10.html

June 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/creating-community-garden-9.html

April 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/creating-community-garden-8.html

March 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/creating-community-garden-7.html

Feb 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/creating-community-garden-6.html

Jan 2013
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/creating-community-garden-5.html

Oct 2012
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/creating-community-garden-4.html

Aug 2012
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/creating-community-garden-3.html

Feb 2012
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/02/creating-community-garden-2.html

Jan 2012
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.com/2012/01/creating-community-garden.html


 

Tuesday, 13 May 2014

St David’s 2, Cardiff

Previously, I left you at Starbucks on the bridge between the original St David’s/Dewi Sant and the 2009 extension. Walk into the impressive Grand Arcade.

Keep to the left side and at the crossways look down and read a couple of lines from the Welsh national anthem on the arcade floor below: Tra môr yn fur i'r bur hoff bau, O bydded i'r hen iaith barhau (While seas secure this land so pure, O may the old language endure). Turn left into the upper floor of Eastside – the food and drink district of St David’s.


On your left:

Signor Valentino
90 Grand Arcade/9 Bridge Street Arcade (Unit KUGO1), Upper Eastside CF10 2DP (2022 4944)
Signor Valentino was launched in Cardiff Bay in 2001. Building on their success in that location, this local company, steered by Director Babak Arabestani (who also owns Bellini’s and Demiros), opened its second Cardiff outlet in St David’s a couple of years ago. The food is described as ‘contemporary Italian’ and the menu breaks down into the following sections: Antipasta, Pasta, Secondi (focus on chicken, veal and steak), Pizza, Dolci and gelati, Express lunch, and Bambino (here defined as the under-10s). Roughly, Bellini’s is more child-friendly, and pasta and pizza orientated, while Signor Valentino offers a wider Italian menu. The company supports the charity Action Against Hunger (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. Dec 2013).

Chimichanga
11 Bridge Street Arcade (Unit KUGO2), Upper Eastside CF10 2EF
This Mexican-style restaurant chain has two outlets in Cardiff (the other in The Old Brewery Quarter). Fajitas, burritos, enchilada, quesadilla and, indeed, chimichanga (a deep-fried burrito) – this chain helped these enter the English language; although the chain has very little connection with Mexico. The first Chimichanga was opened in Braintree Essex in 2004 as part of the Prezzo restaurant group, which still own it. Prezzo’s Mexican concept restaurants are undergoing a period of expansion (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. May 2012).

Café Rouge
13 Bridge Street Arcade (Unit KUGO3), Upper EastsideCF10 2EF
This French bistro-themed restaurant chain serves a range of classic dishes, such as croquet monsieur, baguettes, steak frites and boeuf bourguignon. There are two Café Rouge in Cardiff, the other being in Cardiff Bay. The first Café Rouge opened in London in 1989 and there are now over 125 Café Rouges throughout the UK. Café Rouge is owned by the Tragus Group, who also own Strada and Bella Italia (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. Feb 2014).

T.G.I Friday’s
15-17 Bridge Street Arcade (Unit KUGO5), Upper Eastside CF10 2EF
T.G.I. Friday’s is an American-themed (they mean USA) restaurant, serving ‘American favourites’, including Prime Choice Burgers, Ribs, BBQ, and (I am sure they made this one up) chicken cooked in Jack Daniel’s whiskey. The focus is on grilled food, and the bar. Current promotion is tapas. The website gives the bestsellers for each T.G.I Friday’s outlet. In St David’s, the top-seller is The Chicken Finger BLT, followed by The Monster Burger, The Downtown Chicken Finger BLT, and The Friday’s Jack Daniel’s Burger. That’s probably all the information you need, as to whether you will love it or loathe it. There are over 60 T.G.I. Friday’s in the UK, with another in Cardiff (just) as you start to come into the city on Newport Road. T.G.I. was founded by Alan Stillman in New York in 1965, as a singles’ bar. The chain now promotes itself as a family restaurant and it is certainly popular with kids. A Harley Davidson motorbike and The Hulk set the tone for the décor in the St David’s branch. A noisy ambience usually prevails (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. Jan 2013).

On the other side of Upper Eastside (across an empty space where seats used to reside):

Ruby Tuesday
18 Bridge Street Arcade (Unit KUGO6), Upper Eastside CF10 2EF (2034 9930)
This represents a bit of a coup for St David’s ,in that this was the first Ruby Tuesday in the UK (they have since opened a second in Cheltenham). The very first Ruby Tuesday was opened on the campus of the University of Tennessee in 1972. However, it was not until the 1990s that the brand really took off. There are now nearly 900 company-owned and franchised restaurants across the United States and worldwide. The US-based Ruby Tuesday offers ‘simple fresh American dining’. That means lots of burgers, salads, chicken, steak, crab cakes and fish, and BBQ ribs. The burgers include their new range of pretzel burgers and the triple prime bacon cheddar burger. Hickory bourbon chicken continues a cooking-with-whiskey theme. It’s flatbreads not pizza. Something slightly difference then, as it’s a chain you probably won’t have encountered before; although vegetarians might want to give it a miss (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. Dec 2013).

Pizza Express
16 Bridge Street Arcade (Unit KUGO7) Upper Eastside CF10 2EF (2035 9200)
Pizza Express was launched in 1965, in London’s Wardour Street by Peter Boizot. It serves authentic-style Italian pizza, pasta, salads and desserts. The thin, crispy Roman-style pizzas are commendable, compared to the indignities the humble pizza has suffered in the hands of some chains. There are over 400 Pizza Express outlets in the UK, with three in Cardiff (the others being on the High Street and in Cardiff Bay). Chefs with stripy tops, designer touches, and being known for live jazz (though not in this branch) have helped make this is a distinctive brand (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. March 2012).

Prezzo
14 Bridge Street Arcade (Unit KUGO8) Upper Eastside CF10 2EF
Prezzo ("price" in Italian) is a UK chain of Italian-style restaurants. The first opened in London in 2000, and there are currently over 150 branches in the UK there's a second branch in Cardiff on St Mary Street.  Prezzo build their design around impressive stone-baked pizza ovens, and serve pizza and calzones, pastas and risottos, chargrilled chicken and salads. Prezzo is operated as part of the Prezzo restaurant group, which also includes Chimichanga and several other restaurant brands in the UK (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. Feb 2013).

Nando’s
12 Bridge Street Arcade (Unit KUGO9) Upper Eastside CF10 2EF (2066 7878)
Peri-peri chicken is the main dish in this popular chain, which started in South Africa and derives from a Portuguese-southern Africa food fusion. If you want to spot celebrities (they can blag free dining), then you best go to one of the other two Cardiff Nando’s: Mermaid Quay (Cardiff Bay) or The Old Brewery Quarter (Food Hygiene Rating 4: good. Sept 2013).

Turning right when you enter the Grand Arcade:

Auntie Anne’s
68 Grand Arcade CF10 2ER
This USA-based chain originated in 1988 from a stall in a Pennsylvania Farmers’ Market. However, any resemblance to a down-home country stall has long since gone, as this multinational snack food brand now has over 1,200 stores in 24 countries. In the UK, Auntie Anne's operates around 20-and-rising mall kiosks in busy, high footfall locations. It continues a previous shopping mall theme on this blog, which is the focus on selling US kids’ foods to adults. Auntie Anne’s sell sweet (e.g. vanilla sugar, chocolate) and savoury (e.g. cheese, pepperoni, sesame) pretzels. I must admit, pretzels are a food stuff which I find inedible; and even George W. Bush choked on his patriotic pretzels once while watching the Superbowl (Food Hygiene Rating 4: good. Nov 2013).

Carrying along to the end of the Grand Arcade, to one of several entrances to:

John Lewis
The Hayes CF10 1EG
Opened in September 2009 as the anchor store for the St David’s 2 extension, this four-story shop with its triple-glazed prow, designed by Ericsson Architects, is one of Cardiff’s new iconic buildings. Within that glass frontage on the third floor is John Lewis’ restaurant, The Place to Eat, a spacious, light-filled and relaxing lunch stop for shoppers. There is a good selection of hot and cold food at lunchtimes, it’s family-friendly and there is seating for 293 people.

Descend to the ground floor and walk back toward the Eastside dining zone:

Whittard Coffee
A pop-up in the middle of the Grand Arcade’s ground floor , selling coffee, tea and hot chocolate; whereas the Whittard we previously encountered in Queens Arcade sells it for you to make at home.

Costa
Grand Arcade CF10 2ER
Coffee shop, with seats spilling out into the arcade, which here, as a disruption to all the clean lines, is a good thing (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. Feb 2013).

Turn right into the ground floor of Eastside. On your right:

Spudulike
2 Bridge Street Arcade CF10 2EF (2034 2741)
This jacket potato and filling franchise serves jacket potatoes and a range of fillings. The first Spudulike opened in Edinburgh in 1974. Today there are around 50 Spudulikes; the other one in Wales is in the Welsh Designer Outlet Village, Bridgend. I had one with chili con carne once, when I needed something substantial quickly. Slow-cooked and served fast is a modest usp, but they delivered. In addition to the classic jacket potatoes, they now crushed boiled potatoes with salad and lighter fillings on top (Food Hygiene Rating 4: good. Feb 2013).

Toby Carvery
Bridge Street Arcade CF10 2EF
There are two  more typical Toby Carvery restaurants on the outskirts of Cardiff. This new Toby sandwich express outlet represents a recent departure for the brand. It offers take-away carvery meats in a baguette. There are seats, but not as many as you would expect, as the kitchen area has taken much of the seating space used by the previous occupier (which had the film screens and I can’t remember its name).  Mainstays of the menu are sandwiches with roast beef, roast pork, roast turkey and stuffing, and the token ‘veggie one’.

Muffin Break
12 Bridge Street Arcade CF10 2EF
There are close to 50 Muffin Break franchises in the UK, but this is the only one in Wales. The HQ is in Cambridge, from where the latest news is they have started a new range of tartlets. Muffins, cakes, baguettes, wraps, toasties and paninis, plus coffee, milkshakes and the rest. Their website 'uses cookies (but not the type you eat)'; a joke I am surprised I don’t see more often (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. Feb 2013).

Mt Fuji
11 Bridge Street Arcade CF10 2EF
The newest addition to Eastside, this Teriyaki restaurant has made best use of its long thin space by styling it like a Japanese Shinkansen (bullet) train. Mt Fuji serves traditional bento and non bento meals, including chicken teriyaki, chicken karage, pork tonkatsu, Japanese curry, donburi bowl meals, tempura and sushi. It is licensed and drinks include sake, Japanese beers and soft drinks, and green tea. This is a Japanese-based company, with another UK restaurant in Birmingham’s Bullring Centre. Mt Fuji operates an online Japanese import food shop for UK deliveries.

Cadwalader’s
8 Bridge Street Arcade CF10 2EF
Cadwalader’s was started by David and Hannah Cadwalader in 1927 in Criccieth, north Wales. There are around 11 Cadwalader ice cream parlour and coffee houses in the UK, with another in Cardiff in a prime location jutting out over the water in Cardiff Bay. In addition to classic vanilla ice cream 'made to Hannah Cadwalader’s original recipe', expect a wide range of ice cream and dessert flavours. Recent company promotions include cream teas and soups served in bread (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. Nov 2011).

Bellini’s Express
7 Bridge Street Arcade CF10 2EF (2022 0225)
This is the third of three Welsh-based businesses in St David’s 2 (though it has the same owner as Signor Valentino). The original Bellini’s is still in Park Place, Cardiff. This one opened in 2010 and offers a more informal Italian dining experience.

Yo! Sushi
5 Bridge Street Arcade CF10 2EF (2060 2174)
The chain that introduced the conveyor belt, from which you select your colour/price coded sushi. Yo! Sushi has around 54 UK outlets, but this is the only one in Wales. They serve over 80 Japanese inspired dishes, including hot classics, soup/broth, rice and noodle dishes, sashimi, sushi, tempura, salads, hand rolls and desserts (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. June 2013).

Pret a Manger
3 Bridge Street Arcade CF10 2EF (2079 325433 – yes, I know this number is probably wrong, but it’s the one on their website)
Pret a Manger first opened in London in 1986. They suffered a bit of an image problem as a high-end sandwich shop when McDonald’s had a stake in their ownership, but McDonald’s are no longer involved in Pret a Manager, which has operated since 2008 as a private company. The CEO is Clive Schlee. The company are going from strength-to-strength, with impressive annual sales climb figures, partly as a result of closing small sandwich shop outlets and opening bigger shops with plenty of eat-in seating; expanding in the process, with 26 new outlets in the UK opening last year.  I was at one of their newest branches in London recently and was pleasantly surprised by the wide selection of food on offer, particularly the options for a healthy lunch (we sampled Lebanese flat breads, a falafel wrap, and some sushi, but were tempted by many of the interesting flavours of soup, salad, and sandwiches). Pret currently have around 350 shops worldwide, mainly in the UK.  There are two in Cardiff, with a more recent one opening in the revitalised Capitol Centre last year (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. Dec 2011).

Ed’s Diner
1 Bridge Street Arcade Eastside CF10 2DP (2037 3706)
A retro-American (i.e. USA) diner experience, with 1950s jukebox classics setting the scene. There are 27 Ed’s Easy Diner locations in the UK, with the other Welsh outlet being in Bridgend. The main thing here is burgers (10 types), along with grilled chicken, hot dogs, and all-day breakfasts. The first Ed’s Diner opened in 1987 in London's Soho (Food Hygiene Rating 5: very good. August 2013).

Those in the know will tell you that the letting agency for St David’s have done a fantastic job attracting businesses, from the anchor stores and top designer stores, through to national and international food chains and some more unusual (for the UK) eating outlets. The Scandinavian imports also add character, with Tiger (good range of spices) now joining Clas Ohlson in St David’s. It has put St David’s in the top 10, in terms of visitor numbers, for UK shopping centres.

Leave by the nearest exit. Opposite you will see the new Admiral Building nearing completion. We will be turning right, for a walk around the outside the St David’s Centre.

See also:
Bellini's Express
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2011/03/bellinis-express-cardiff.html

Previously, on the Walking Tour of Cardiff:

St David’s 1
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/st-davids-1-cardiff.html

Queen Street Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/queens-arcade-cardiff.html

Duke Street Arcade and Duke Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/03/duke-street-arcade-duke-street-cardiff.html

High Street Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/high-street-arcade-cardiff.html

Church Street and St John’s Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/church-street-and-st-johns-street.html

Cardiff Market
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/cardiff-market.html

Wharton Street and Trinity Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/12/wharton-street-and-trinity-street.html

Morgan Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/12/morgan-arcade-cardiff.html

Royal Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/royal-arcade-cardiff.html

The Hayes
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/the-hayes-cardiff.html

The Old Brewery Quarter
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/the-old-brewery-quarter-cardiff.html

Caroline Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/caroline-street-cardiff.html

Mill Lane and Wyndham Arcade
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/mill-lane-and-wyndham-arcade-cardiff.html

St Mary Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/st-mary-street-cardiff.html

High Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/05/high-street-cardiff.html

Castle Arcade and Castle Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/05/castle-arcade-and-castle-street-cardiff.html

Womanby Street and Quay Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/womanby-street-and-quay-street-cardiff.html

Westgate Street
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/westgate-street-cardiff.html

Riverside
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/riverside-cardiff.html

Cathedral Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/cathedral-road-cardiff.html

Pontcanna 2
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/pontcanna-2.html

Pontcanna 1
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/pontcanna-1-we-are-leaving-canton.html

North Canton
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/north-canton.html

Cowbridge Road East 3
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/cowbridge-road-east-3-llandaff-road-to.html

Cowbridge Road East 2
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/cowbridge-road-east-2-wyndham-crescent.html

Cowbridge Road East 1
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/cowbridge-road-east-1-cathedral-road-to.html

Bute Park
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/bute-park-cardiff.html

Cathays Park
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/cathays-park-cardiff.html

Cathays Terrace
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/cathays-terrace-cardiff.html

Salisbury Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/salisbury-road-cardiff.html

Woodville Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/woodville-road-cardiff.html

Crwys Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/crwys-road-cardiff.html

Wellfield Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/wellfield-road-cardiff.html

Albany Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/albany-road-cardiff.html

City Road
http://sfnottingham.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/city-road-cardiff.html